The Five Travellers You Become in Singapore

1. The Culture Vulture


One of the things you’d be blind not to notice while wandering the streets of Singapore is the crazy mix of cultures; East meets west; big business meets small village-like streets; Chinatown meets Little India. The city is the O.G melting pot- belonging to no one and therefore everyone.

The transport system is fantastic in the city, so during our time there we took to metro everywhere. This meant that every time we wandered back up from the air-conditioned underground we were hit in the face with the sudden humidity and a completely new cultural backdrop to wherever we were last.

Chinatown is a fantastic example of this- if you’re there definitely check it out. The town sprawls out in every direction, centred around the spectacularly ornate Buddha Tooth Relic Temple. The architectural style of the traditional shop fronts spans hundreds of years and this gives you an instant insight into the history of the Chinese community in Singapore. Be sure to check out this area as the sun goes down; the hanging lanterns that flood the streets into a warm light every evening give Chinatown a wonderful glow. The markets and the food here (more on that later) are worth the trip alone.

Little India and Arab Street showcase yet more cultural diversity. The brightly coloured houses and street art that brings Little India to life make wandering these streets a cultural experience in itself. The diverse places of worship, often side by side, seem to compete with their bright decoration but stand in harmony otherwise. For food, art, and architecture from all over the world, within walking distance, definitely choose Singapore.

2. The Foodie

Singapore serves up a crazy array of snacks. From the traditional dishes to the millennial oddities you’re pretty much guaranteed to try something that you’ve never sampled anywhere else.

The best place to start is at one of Singapore’s many Hawkers. The Hawker centres are collections of small food vendors and cafes based around a large seating area. The idea is that you sample a little bit from a few places and make your own mix-and match banquet. We went to the Newton Hawker and tried some great dishes accompanied by soursop juice- super refreshing!

Chilli crab is the top traditional dish- we saw it served all over the city. A full crab served up with a hot sauce, I wouldn’t even know where to start with that dish. Ryan and I are both vegetarians, however, and although we were tempted by Singapore’s wide array of seafood specialities, we had to look a bit further for veggie grub.

Chinatown came to our rescue. Amongst the collection of authentic street food trucks which pepper the narrow streets, there was a vegan stall (‘Hello Baby’) which served delicious alternatives to the classic dishes. We tried the vegan chilli crab which was made up from pulled mushrooms and the ionic chilli sauce.

Perhaps my favourite food venture in Singapore was, admittedly, a little less traditional. Two words: Selfie coffee. It literally is just that, it does exactly what it says on the tin. Tucked away down one of the tiny lanes near Arab Street, lit up by eclectic street art, we found Selfie Coffee. When you order, you take your selfie and wait as it is seemingly magically transferred on to the top of your latte. Super heavy on the cream front and an odd experience all round, but I would definitely snap up (ey…) this rare opportunity to drink your own face.

3. The History Buff

There are many things that give Singapore a uniqueness today, but its singularity throughout history is also really fascinating. As I’ve mentioned, you can see ongoing overlapping of cultures as you walk around the city and the reason for this lies in Singapore’s dynamic history.

As we discovered at the National History Museum, there is little known of the ‘original’ residents of Singapore. Located at the tip of the Malay peninsula, the city has always been a vital point for trade in Southeast Asia. After this trade route was monopolised by the Dutch (up until 1819), the British made their mark. Endeavours such as the East India company relied on Singapore’s strategic position and it was, therefore, a strong part of the British colony.

Even before these colonial days, Singapore was primarily used as a trade port. This led to Chinese merchants settling in particular areas and a specific cultural history known as ‘Peranakan’ has evolved from there. There is a Peranakan museum for anyone who wants to get a bit more niche after getting an overall insight at the National History museum.

If you’re interested in this aspect of Singaporean history, it is also worth taking a stroll down Telok Ayer Street. Tucked away right next to the business district this street seems to take you back in time. It was where the first Chinese merchants settled, and it has retained its charm and character ever since. It is also a great place to stop for a coffee and marvel at the mad cultural diversity of the whole district.

4. The Eco Warrior

We’ve seen planet Earth II, so we all know that Singapore is making a HUGE push to become a greener city. From a mass clean of the rivers (which started in 1977 under the then Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew) to Gardens by the Bay, Singapore has gradually been encouraging wildlife to return to the city and doing its part to build a more sustainable future.

Within the crazy complex which is Gardens by the Bay, the Supertree Grove is the real show stopper. You’ll have seen these before; insane towering structures reaching up to 50 metres tall, flowers and greenery crawling up their sides, illuminated by mesmerising pink and purple lights. The trees and their surrounding greenery have become a haven for insects and birds that may otherwise not prosper in the city environment.

If we needed any proof of the insect activity in the Supertree Grove we certainly got it. As dusk fell and the scent of the flowers grew more pungent the insects met with their nemesis: SO MANY BATS. The bats were not afraid of humans either, weaving and winding their ways through the crowd (some less successfully than others, one poor girl took a bat straight to the face), trying to catch as many insects as possible. It was pretty crazy to see natures food chain in action on such a concentrated scale. I can appreciate this phenomenon now, but of course at the time I was shitting myself.

At the other side of Gardens by the Bay you can explore the Flower Dome and the Cloud Dome. Within these fascinating structures (massive greenhouses in the shape of, well, domes) you’ll catch glimpses of plants that you’d struggle to come across anywhere else in the world. Housing many endangered botanical species, they play such an important part for conservation, a massively important cause.

5. The Art Critic

The final character you will find yourself slipping into while roaming this vibrant city is the art critic. With so many places to view so many kinds of art, Singapore is any art lovers dream.

The art venues around the city are arguably as enticing as the art itself. The National Gallery is located in what used to be Singapore’s court house and is surrounded by impressive stately buildings.

You can find a great trove of modern art within the Gillman barracks complex, with each small building showcasing a different artist. I personally loved this set up, jumping from place to place rather than spending all day traipsing around one huge building.

For something a little different, check out the ArtScience Museum. When we went there was a ‘When Science Meets Art’ exhibition on which served up some incredible interactive visuals. Again, the building itself is fascinating; located at Marina Bay Sands you can take in a breath-taking view of the cityscape after playing around with the glowing digital waterfalls that the Science Museum exhibits.

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So whatever kind of traveller you are, whatever tickles your fancy, Singapore is pretty much guaranteed to take your breath away. With so much to learn, see, taste and try, I’m sure that you’ll become obsessed with this diverse city!

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